James Turrell installation opens at Louis Vuitton in Las Vegas

Related articles The many faces of Louis Vuitton’s chequerboard collection Street artist Eine, AKA Ben Eine, is best known for his alphabet lettering that adorns many a east London shop shutter in the trendy Brick Lane and Shoreditch areas, and he is a contemporary of Banksy and Gorillaz co-creator Jamie Hewlett. He began his career as an underground artist but found fame of a sort when David Cameron More Info gifted a piece of his work, ‘Twenty First Century City’, to Barack Obama in 2010. IN PICTURES: The many faces of Louis Vuitton’s chequerboard collection Now he’s designed artwork which is emblazoned upon Vuitton’s ‘Giant Square’ scarf, which measures an impressive 136cm x 136cm, and will launch exclusively at Selfridges Oxford Street on Monday. Titled ‘Great Adventures’, the neon-lettered artwork on the scarf illustrates “how I feel, every time you get off a plane in a new city, it is the beginning of an adventure, all about new encounters,” says Eine. To celebrate the collaboration, Louis Vuitton will open a new pop-up space dedicated to Textiles on the Ground Floor at Selfridges, and the man himself will be there from Friday, June 21 until Sunday, June 23 graffitting the space in preparation for its grand opening on Monday. The scarf will be available exclusively at Selfridges until July 1, after which it will be available worldwide at Louis Vuitton stores and concessions, priced at £465.

The agency’s director-general Nopparat Benjawatananun said this week : “When Lord Buddha was alive, there wasn’t anything like this. There were no cars, smartphones or cameras, so the rules were much simpler. While the monks need to keep themselves abreast of new knowledge, current events and technology, they are restrained to choose the appropriate tools. Nopparat added that the Buddhist monks in the video were acting “inappropriately, not composed and not adhering to Buddha’s teachings of simplicity and self-restraint.” Glad that’s settled. He did, however, offer one interesting piece of data by way of explanation:  ”In many cases, it was the followers who gave the monks the luxury. Some bought them sports cars.

For everyone else, a virtual tour: On the workshop’s ground floor, artisans select and prime materials. Here, carpenters create the skeletons of those legendary LV trunks with supple wood sourced from France and Africa, the combination of which helps the luggage withstand variable weather conditions. Nearby, the less exotic leathers are stored — lamb and goat for linings, veal and cowhide for exteriors — all at a constant temperature (between 16 and 19 degrees Celsius). The house’s signature material is flesh-colored natural cowhide leather, the basis for all monogram bags. The more exotic leathers — stingray so thick you can’t stitch into it, python skins as long as eight meters — require specific expertise. Each exotic skin is colored and given a matte or glazed finish, then cut with pressurized machines, except for special orders, which are always cut by hand.

On Wednesday French police appeared to have made a breakthrough. READ  ( ) » The Catholic shrine of Lourdes, Haute-Pyrénées under 1.4 metres of water after severe flooding in south-western France, which claimed its victim in the early hours of Wednesday. Photo: P. Pavani/AFP Second victim swept to death in French floods Flash floods in south west France claimed their second victim on Wednesday when a 75-year-old man was swept away to his death in the raging waters. The flooded Catholic shrine of Lourdes was like ‘a scene from a disaster movie’ according to one hotel owner. READ  ( ) » Aedes albopictus – the Tiger mosquito. Users can check an interactive new map to get warnings and when and where to invest in some bug spray. Photo: Vigilance Moustiques/CDC France maps out defence for war on mosquitos As temperatures rise and the rains continue to fall, concerns in France have turned to the country’s surging mosquito population. A new interactive map looks set to give residents and holiday-makers a head start in avoiding those nasty mossie bites.

France maps out defence for war on mosquitos

(Florian Holzherr) By Adam Tschorn June 10, 2013, 2:21 p.m. LAS VEGAS — A Louis Vuitton-commissioned James Turrell installation, which recently opened at the French luxury brand’s City Center store here, is not only one of the most intimate and unexpected ways to experience the artist’s oeuvre, it may just be the best antidote we’ve found yet to counteract the swirling, light-caused disconnectedness of Sin City chaos. Titled “Akhob,” (a word from Egypt’s Amarna period that means “pure water,” according to a guide), the permanent installation, which opened on the fourth floor of the Louis Vuitton boutique last month, is the largest of Turrell’s “ganzfeld” (light field) installations to date. It consists of two chambers, each with a circular opening, and a pattern of slowly changing light, which repeats every 24 minutes. Viewers are suffused in a shifting palette of vibrant pinks, electric blues and a peculiar shade of orange that makes the circular orb space at the room’s center look like the surface of the sun itself. At times the edges of the two chambers are clearly visible, at other times they bleed into a disorientingly uniform field of color. Although I’m certainly no art critic, and my knowledge of Turrell’s oeuvre prior to “Akhob” consisted of a partial walk-through of his current LACMA retrospective (though in fairness that included being slid, MRI-like, into a metal sphere called “Light Reignfall” where, for about 12 minutes psychedelic kaleidoscope images swirled, eddied and broke like waves over my optical nerves), I can say from personal experience that after a day and a half in Las Vegas, I’ve yet to find a better course correcter than a half-hour stint bathed in the glow of “Akhob.” Pure water indeed.  “Akhob” is the latest of three projects Louis Vuitton Handbags commissioned by Louis Vuitton , including a modular, light-based sculpture called “First Blush, Oct. 2005” that was created for Vuitton’s Champs-Elysées flagship store, and a series of 2006 photographs juxtaposing one of the brand’s iconic wardrobe trunks against the Arizona desert landscape of Turrell’s ongoing Roden Crater project.   Open since May 2, viewing of the installation is free and open to the public, but limited to four people at a time (private parties can have up to six), so reservations must be scheduled in advance.

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