James Turrell installation opens at Louis Vuitton in Las Vegas

Related articles The many faces of Louis Vuitton’s chequerboard collection Street artist Eine, AKA Ben Eine, is best known for his alphabet lettering that adorns many a east London shop shutter in the trendy Brick Lane and Shoreditch areas, and he is a contemporary of Banksy and Gorillaz co-creator Jamie Hewlett. He began his career as an underground artist but found fame of a sort when David Cameron gifted a piece of his work, ‘Twenty First Century City’, to Barack Obama in 2010. IN PICTURES: The many faces of Louis Vuitton’s chequerboard collection Now he’s designed artwork which is emblazoned upon Vuitton’s ‘Giant Square’ scarf, which measures an impressive 136cm x 136cm, and will launch exclusively at Selfridges Oxford Street on Monday. Titled ‘Great Adventures’, the neon-lettered artwork on the scarf illustrates “how I feel, every time you get off a plane in a new city, it is the beginning of an adventure, all about new encounters,” says Eine. To celebrate the collaboration, Louis Vuitton will open a new pop-up space dedicated to Textiles on the Ground Floor at Selfridges, and the man himself will be there from Friday, June 21 until Sunday, June 23 graffitting the space in preparation for its grand opening on Monday. The scarf will be available exclusively at Selfridges until July 1, after which it will be available worldwide at Louis Vuitton stores and concessions, priced at £465.

The video has sparked criticism from all over the world, prompting Thailand’s Office of National Buddhism to announce it is now monitoring the monks for inappropriate behavior. The agency’s director-general Nopparat Benjawatananun said this week : “When Lord Buddha was alive, there wasn’t anything like this. There were no cars, smartphones or cameras, so the rules were much simpler. While the monks need to keep themselves abreast of new knowledge, current events and technology, they are restrained to choose the appropriate tools. Nopparat added that the Buddhist monks in the video were acting “inappropriately, not composed and not adhering to Buddha’s teachings of simplicity and self-restraint.” Glad that’s settled. He did, however, offer one interesting piece of data by way of explanation:  ”In many cases, it was the followers who gave the monks the luxury. Some bought them sports cars.

Chapman Brothers x Louis Vuitton Fall/Winter 2013 Men’s Accessories Collection

And now, we have one more—pretty gargantuan—reason to talk about the house. Today, Vuitton revealed that its new window installations will not consist of the brightly hued works of an eccentric or iconic artist (cue Stephen Sprouse and Yayoi Kusama). Instead, the brand has opted for dinosaurs. Seven stores worldwide—including the boutiques on Paris’ Champs Élysées, London’s New Bond Street, and New York’s Fifth Avenue—will get the Jurassic treatment, hosting golden reproductions of prehistoric skeletons in their facades. Velociraptors, Dimetrodons, Stegosauruses, Tyrannosaurus Rexes, and Triceratopses are just some of the species that will inhabit the displays, which were apparently inspired by a trip to My Website the Natural History Museum in Paris’ Les Jardins des Plantes. On view from tomorrow, the beasts seem fairly friendly—mannequins wearing Vuitton’s Pre-Fall ’13 wares are perched peacefully atop the creatures’ backs. —Katharine K. Zarrella

With Fall comes a whole host of fashions and accessories. Louis Vuitton teamed up with sibling fashion duo Jake and Dinos Chapman a.k.a. the Chapman Brothers to go in on the Fall/Winter Accessories collection. Known for their eye-catching and provocative designs, The Chapman Brothers brought a new element to the Louis Vuitton brand. The bags and scarves are adorned with a heavily embroidered and colorful pattern, compliments of the Chapmans. The edgy patterns have navy blue and red bases, with owls, vines, flowers, sharp-teethed koalas, and even an eye ball as part of the design. This limited edition collection will be dropping soon at Louis Vuitton stores worldwide. Check the gallery after the jump to some of the pieces and the design.

The “6 Wild” gang had what it thought was a foolproof cash and drug-flow scheme. They’d rob other gangsters of drugs and cash under the safe assumption that the victims wouldn’t call the cops. First, though, they’d send in young female gang members to befriend the intended victims and find out where and when the goods would be on hand. Trouble was, their girl spies didn’t always bring back reliable information. On at least three occasions in February, 2012, 6 Wild wound up mistakenly beating and holding guns to the heads of Bronx civilians — who did in fact report the brutal robberies to the police, officials said. Eleven alleged members, all from the Bronx and between the ages of 19 and 24, have been charged with conspiracy, robbery, burglary, assault, menacing, strangulation and drug possession The investigation was the joint effort of the NYPD, the city’s Special Narcotics Prosecutor, Bridget Brennan, and the Bronx DA’s office. The gang carried out around two home invasion robberies a month and frequently spurred retaliatory shootings in the Bronx and Harlem, officials said. They’d carry off their loot in oversized bags by Louis Vuitton and Gucci, Brennan said in announcing the bust. “They swore allegiance to only one thing — the Gucci bags full of cash that they collected from committing their crimes,” Brennan said. In addition to attracting police attention by mistakenly robbing civilians, 6 Wild further incriminated itself by posting scores of photos on Facebook showing off their stolen cash, jewelry and watches, often posted on the same day as the robberies.

LAS VEGAS — A Louis Vuitton-commissioned James Turrell installation, which recently opened at the French luxury brand’s City Center store here, is not only one of the most intimate and unexpected ways to experience the artist’s oeuvre, it may just be the best antidote we’ve found yet to counteract the swirling, light-caused disconnectedness of Sin City chaos. Titled “Akhob,” (a word from Egypt’s Amarna period that means “pure water,” according to a guide), the permanent installation, which opened on the fourth floor of the Louis Vuitton boutique last month, is the largest of Turrell’s “ganzfeld” (light field) installations to date. It consists of two chambers, each with a circular opening, and a pattern of slowly changing light, which repeats every 24 minutes. Viewers are suffused in a shifting palette of vibrant pinks, electric blues and a peculiar shade of orange that makes the circular orb space at the room’s center look like the surface of the sun itself. At times the edges of the two chambers are clearly visible, at other times they bleed into a disorientingly uniform field of color. Although I’m certainly no art critic, and my knowledge of Turrell’s oeuvre prior to “Akhob” consisted of a partial walk-through of his current LACMA retrospective (though in fairness that included being slid, MRI-like, into a metal sphere called “Light Reignfall” where, for about 12 minutes psychedelic kaleidoscope images swirled, eddied and broke like waves over my optical nerves), I can say from personal experience that after a day and a half in Las Vegas, I’ve yet to find a better course correcter than a half-hour stint bathed in the glow of “Akhob.” Pure water indeed.  “Akhob” is the latest of three projects commissioned by Louis Vuitton , including a modular, light-based sculpture Louis Vuitton Handbags called “First Blush, Oct. 2005” that was created for Vuitton’s Champs-Elysées flagship store, and a series of 2006 photographs juxtaposing one of the brand’s iconic wardrobe trunks against the Arizona desert landscape of Turrell’s ongoing Roden Crater project.   Open since May 2, viewing of the installation is free and open to the public, but limited to four people at a time (private parties can have up to six), so reservations must be scheduled in advance.

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